International TV series

Everybody knows I love American series, but there are good series that are not in English. Here are some of them.

Deutschland 83

Language: German

In 1983, during the Cold War, a young East German soldier is chosen to spy a West German official who has information about US plans to install missiles in the West Germany.

Continue reading

Review Radio D Course – Deutsche Welle

I believe that the Radio D course is the most basic and easier course between the various courses available in the Deutsche Welle website. Officially, the course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of German, that is, for students who are in the A1 and A2 levels. And, is focused more on basic listening.

Characters

In the course Radio D we follow the routine of Phillip, a young reporter who starts working at Radio D. He works with the reporters Paula and Ayhan. But these are not the only characters. In the course there are also others important characters: Compu, a talking computer that does researches; Eulalia, a curious and talkative owl; and, Josefine, the woman responsible for cleaning the office. In the second part of the course, Ayhan no longer participates and another character enters the scene, the new intern in the editorial room: Jan Becker.

Radio D-2 Continue reading

Christmas gifts for polyglots

We are almost a month away from Christmas and polyglots, like everyone else, love to receive Christmas presents, but in a more nerdy way. Check out some tips to give a present to a polyglot friend, son, partner or even yourself.

  1. Assimil

Assimil is one of my favorite methods; you can check my review of the French course here. The course focus on dialogues with few grammatical explanations. All dialogs are translated in the other side of the page. Each course has its own dialogues. For Francophones, there are over 70 languages courses available, so it is probably the reason that Assimil is the most popular course in France. For English speakers, there are only 12 languages ​​courses available, for Spanish speakers there are 13 courses and for Portuguese speakers there are only 5 courses. Continue reading

Interview with Igor from Missão Poliglota

igorbarca_1375816613_16Igor Barca is the founder of the blog Missão Poliglota and of the School Estude Idiomas. He is a professor of English, French and Italian. Currently, he is also studying German and Japanese. His mission is to master at least 10 languages.

  1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

I am Brazilian. Then I speak Portuguese as a native language, but early on I got interested in languages. The first foreign language I learned was Italian. Despite having lost some eloquence from lack of practice, I consider myself fluent today as as I can fast recover the rhythm during a conversation.

On the other hand, my French is becoming more and more fluent, as I have been teaching students very often, including candidates for diplomacy. The English also goes well, according to my last exam of proficiency, which attested to the level C1. I have studied Spanish for two years and today, not so fond of the language, I have only intermediate level.

In addition to these languages, I study German and Japanese. I have been studying German for some time now, but with not enough motivation to evolve. My current mission is to learn Japanese in 90 days. I visited Japan in April and came back very excited with the language! I had studied Japanese before, but that was 10 years ago…

To sum it all: I speak Portuguese, English, French and Italian fluently, have intermediate level in Spanish (thanks to Julio Cortázar and his books, lol), I study German for some time now and I’am starting my studies of the Japanese language. To learn more about my current mission, click here. Continue reading

Interview with Maureen from the blog Mo’s Language Learning Journey

Maureen is a Scottish who love learning languages. She used that passion to find a job and now, in addition to using these languages to work, she also uses them to travel. You can find her in her blog Mo’s Language Learning Journey.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself.

I was born in Scotland in a monolingual household and I started learning languages at high school. My first language was French from age eleven but by the time I finished school at age sixteen, I could barely speak a word even though I passed my exam! Languages were taught very badly in my school with overcrowded classes, but I still enjoyed language lessons. I went to college and studied Spanish which was better because the class only had six people in it. From there, I progressed to university and there I studied Spanish and, to a lesser extent, Italian. Following university, my languages enabled me to gain employment in an international company within their Finance Department and I travelled regularly to their offices in Italy and Spain. Years later, my career within the Finance Industry progressed and I passed my professional accountancy qualifications. I would never have worked in Finance if I had not studied languages. Continue reading

Beginner’s mistake: overusing the dictionary

Today, I will talk about another common mistake that language learners make: the excessive use of the dictionary. It’s okay to have a dictionary to solve doubts, but this should not be the main/most important material used.

dictionary-and-magnifying-glass-1417708

Unfortunately, this is a mistake that many beginners make. It is common to see students with a dictionary under their arm, looking for the meaning of each word they see in from of them and trying to learn vocabulary like crazy. Don’t do that! Continue reading