Interview with Richard Delamore, founder of the app Amikumu

Today, we speak with one of the creators of the app Amikumu, Richard Delamore, aka Evildea, who has been interviewed about Esperanto here.


What is Amikumu?

Amikumu is an app (for iOS and Android) that helps you find people nearby who speak the languages you are learning. For example, if you are learning French, use Amikumu to instantly find, contact and meet up with native French speakers nearby. Some potential ways people can use the app is: Continue reading

Interview with Haikaa

haikaa#HonorYourself, #HonorOthers, #HonorThePlanet, these principles permeate the works of singer-songwriter and author Haikaa. From Brazil, Japan and the US, Haikaa promotes the celebration of diversity as a catalyst for change through music and writing. You can find her on her website, YouTube, Twitter and Facebook.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself.

Hello, first of all, it’s great to be here talking to you. I’m a singer-songwriter and author and I write and sing about love in its many forms. I have lived in three different countries – Brazil, Japan, US – and one of my passions is to celebrate diversity. I think that’s one form of love. I’m a language nerd too so combining music and languages is another way in which I express love. And I have many, many songs about love, self-love, romantic love, universal love because I think it’s a wonderful way to share this feeling.

  1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

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Interview with Erik Zidowecki

erik_avatarErik Zidowecki is a computer programmer and language lover. He is a co-founder of UniLang and founder of Parleremo, both web communities dedicated to helping people learn languages. He is also the Editor in Chief of Parrot Time magazine, a magazine devoted to language, linguistics, culture and the Parleremo community.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself

My name is Erik Zidowecki, and I live in the state of Maine in the USA. I have a mixed heritage of Lithuanian on my father’s side and Canadian on my mother’s, along with a few other ethnicities tossed in. I got my bachelor of science degree in Computers and have been using them for over 20 years in developing resources and materials for people to learn languages.

  1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

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Interview with the President of the Venezuelan Esperanto Association

IMG_20140727_080532 - esperantoRicardo Rodrigues Coutinho was born on May 15, 1980, in Caracas and lives in the Valleys del Tuy. He studied at the School of History of the Central University of Venezuela. He began his studies in the international language Esperanto at the end of 2000 in the Venezuelan Esperanto Association. He was a member of minutes of the Cultural Esperanto Foundation (Fundaesperanto). He also worked as a member of library, secretary and he is the current president of the Venezuelan Esperanto Association. He coordinates the publication Venezuela Stelo , an official organ of the Association.  You can find him on Twitter and Instagram.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself and about the teaching role of the Venezuelan Esperanto Association.

The Venezuelan Esperanto Association is the only nonprofit organization in the country, which brings together Esperanto speakers and promoters of the Esperanto language. I have studied the language, since I was 16, I played a role as disseminator, as well as a teacher of the Association.

The range of courses and workshops have varied greatly over the years, since the work is voluntary and the country situation severely limits the possibilities of offering an intensive service. Despite this, we have: introductory workshops, courses by WhatsApp and You Tube. We also have very important achievements, which include; translations of Doña Barbara, Agriculture of the Torrid Zone, Pequeñas obras del Libertador, poems by Eloy Blanco, Otero Silva, among others.

Learning Esperanto is very fast, among other things because it is very regular and flexible, even though the study of any language is a hobby of high level of commitment. Esperanto is known to be an excellent tool to assimilate other languages, since it allows identifying the basic elements of a language, being an exercise to understand every language in the learning process. Continue reading

Interview with the Youtuber Richard Delamore aka Evildea

EvildeaToday, our interview is with Evidea, famous Youtuber that divulges the Esperanto language. In addition, he is an actor and public speaker. You can find him on his YouTube channel, Twitter and Facebook.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself

My online name is Evildea but my real name is Richard Delamore. I’m an Australian-Esperanto YouTuber, actor and public speaker. In vlog, I do skits, games, and present the newest happenings from the Esperanto community in Esperanto. All my recent videos are subtitled to English.

  1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

I speak English and Esperanto fluently, however I’m also conversational in Mandarin. I took part in my first Mandarin-speaking competition only three weeks ago but I didn’t win. I’ve played with many other languages, but I’m unable to converse in any of them.

  1. Why do you think people should learn Esperanto?

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Interview with the tumbler Laura Fitzgerald

Laura - Tumblr - InterviewToday, I will interview the Irish student Laura Fitzgerald. To know more about her, visit shootabluejay.

1) Tell us a little about yourself.

My name is Laura, I’m 19 years old, and I’m from Dublin, Ireland. I’m studying Spanish and Japanese full-time in university. I like listening to music/singing and playing video games.

 2) What languages do you speak and at what level?

I’m a native English speaker, fluent in Irish and Spanish (non-native speaker of both). I can also speak basic conversational Japanese. Continue reading

Interview with Igor from Missão Poliglota

igorbarca_1375816613_16Igor Barca is the founder of the blog Missão Poliglota and of the School Estude Idiomas. He is a professor of English, French and Italian. Currently, he is also studying German and Japanese. His mission is to master at least 10 languages.

  1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

I am Brazilian. Then I speak Portuguese as a native language, but early on I got interested in languages. The first foreign language I learned was Italian. Despite having lost some eloquence from lack of practice, I consider myself fluent today as as I can fast recover the rhythm during a conversation.

On the other hand, my French is becoming more and more fluent, as I have been teaching students very often, including candidates for diplomacy. The English also goes well, according to my last exam of proficiency, which attested to the level C1. I have studied Spanish for two years and today, not so fond of the language, I have only intermediate level.

In addition to these languages, I study German and Japanese. I have been studying German for some time now, but with not enough motivation to evolve. My current mission is to learn Japanese in 90 days. I visited Japan in April and came back very excited with the language! I had studied Japanese before, but that was 10 years ago…

To sum it all: I speak Portuguese, English, French and Italian fluently, have intermediate level in Spanish (thanks to Julio Cortázar and his books, lol), I study German for some time now and I’am starting my studies of the Japanese language. To learn more about my current mission, click here. Continue reading

Interview with Maureen from the blog Mo’s Language Learning Journey

Maureen is a Scottish who love learning languages. She used that passion to find a job and now, in addition to using these languages to work, she also uses them to travel. You can find her in her blog Mo’s Language Learning Journey.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself.

I was born in Scotland in a monolingual household and I started learning languages at high school. My first language was French from age eleven but by the time I finished school at age sixteen, I could barely speak a word even though I passed my exam! Languages were taught very badly in my school with overcrowded classes, but I still enjoyed language lessons. I went to college and studied Spanish which was better because the class only had six people in it. From there, I progressed to university and there I studied Spanish and, to a lesser extent, Italian. Following university, my languages enabled me to gain employment in an international company within their Finance Department and I travelled regularly to their offices in Italy and Spain. Years later, my career within the Finance Industry progressed and I passed my professional accountancy qualifications. I would never have worked in Finance if I had not studied languages. Continue reading

Interview with Shannon Kennedy from

shannon-kennedyShannon is a super talented person, besides learning languages, she’s an artist (singer/ songwriter). You can find her in her website Eurolinguiste, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

I speak English fluently. It is my native language and the one that I use the most frequently. French comes in close second. It is one of the languages that I speak at home, but I don’t use it as often as English since I live and work in an English-speaking country.

After French and English, Mandarin is the language that I speak the best. Even though I’ve only studied it for a year (the shortest time I’ve spent with other languages), I’ve really worked on it intensely, so my ability in the language progressed much more quickly than languages I’ve studied longer (or that I’ve let slide).

Croatian, German and Italian are languages that I’ve studied in the past but haven’t done a great job of keeping up. I was working quite hard at Croatian up until recently, but I decided to take a break from it to really focus on Mandarin.

Lastly, I’ve recently started studying Russian. I don’t spend a lot of time with it because my focus is still Chinese. I also find it more difficult than the other languages I’ve studied, so my progress is quite  slow. Despite my snail-like pace, however, I really enjoy studying it and look forward to spending more time on it after I sit the HSK exam for Chinese.

To know more: Languages Continue reading

Interview with Noel from

noel-van-vlietNoel van Vliet is not a hiperpolyglot, he is a trilingual who gives great information on his blog Do you want to know how the experts do to learn a language and if a course is good? Well, you’ll find the information on his site.

  1. What languages do you speak and at what level?

I speak Dutch, English and Spanish fluently. But they’re never in a fixed state. If I slack off on speaking English, for example, that particular skill diminishes temporarily, even if my listening isn’t affected. It recovers quickly when I give it the necessary attention. I’ve even started to forget words of my native language Dutch. Not the simple words I used everyday, but those words that you only hear or read every once in a while. I speak something of several other languages as well but I can’t really hold conversations in those languages. And that’s what counts. Continue reading