How To Learn A Language As An Introvert

Everyone learns differently. What works for one person will not necessarily work for another. However there are two classes of personality traits that have things in common when it comes to learning a new language and that is whether you are an extrovert or an introvert.

What Is An Introvert?

 

Generally speaking if you identify as an introvert you will be a deep thinker, be introspective and feel uncomfortable in prolonged social interactions, but be energized by spending time alone. So as an introverted language learner the popular advice of ‘just get out there, meet people and start speaking’ may well fill you with dread.

On the other end of the spectrum, if you have an extrovert personality, you will love meeting new people, be able to chat for hours and feel energized in large groups of people, but find being on your own for extended periods of time difficult.

Is It The Same As Being Shy?

 

Absolutely not. Both introverts and extroverts can be shy. Shyness is a fear of social situations which specifically evokes feelings of nervousness and anxiety. You may have this too, but it’s important to know the difference.

It’s also worth noting that absolutely everyone can be apprehensive about situations that make them uncomfortable. And the good news is shyness can be overcome with practice and patience. Being an introvert is not something you can overcome, and nor should you want to because it has it advantages when it comes to language learning.

Learning Techniques For Introverts

 

  1. Manage Your Energy Levels

Be mindful of how much energy you have left and how and when you can top it up. For example, if you’ve been in a big meeting at work or had a presentation to give at school during the day, that evening will not be the best time to practice talking to strangers because you will already be drained. You will make more progress practising on your own from your textbook.

  1. Be In Control Of Your Social Interactions

Set these up so that they have definite end times. For example at a group meetup let people know in advance that you can only make it for an hour. That way you’re getting the valuable experience of practicing speaking in a real life situation but are not putting unnecessary pressure on yourself.

  1. Talk To Yourself

This is a key technique for introverts who are particularly wary of judgment. Yes it may seem a little crazy at first but it totally works. You will get used to hearing your voice form the new words and it will build your confidence for when you are speaking with others.

  1. Focus on 121 time

As an introvert you will probably find that working with an online tutor whilst being in the comfort of your own surroundings with a set time limit on the interaction, is easier than classroom based learning. Or you may have an introvert buddy that understands the struggle who you can practice with. Either way, encouragement and constructive feedback from someone you trust are powerful things.

  1. Listen to music and watch movies

Find some songs you love in your new language, get up the lyrics on google, hit repeat and sing along. Use your much-needed alone time to your advantage by watching movies and series’ in the language you are learning. Have a dictionary and notepad to hand and make note of any words or phrases that you don’t know and want to practice. You can even use subtitles.

  1. Do a Homestay or Language Exchange

Living with a foreign family for a language exchange (reciprocal hospitality) or homestay (a one way stay) that you have chosen is a great way to feel settled with the person that you plan to practice your language skills with. Choose the right host based on their profile, lifestyle and interests and then chat with them to make sure that they are a good fit with you. Practicing your language skills with somebody you like is always so much easier. Many end up making lifelong friendships with their hosts.

  1. Force Yourself Out Of Your Comfort Zone

Learning a language is also about pushing yourself too. And the bottom line is you can’t get better at speaking if you don’t practice speaking. So while this may not be realistic for everyone, go somewhere where you can’t escape speaking your new language. Not right away but once you’ve been practicing the above techniques for a while this a great way of getting to the next level.

Whether you are an introvert or an extrovert, shy or outgoing, anyone can learn a language and ultimately language learning should fun and fulfilling, not something that depletes your energy and fills you with frustration.

So be aware of being an introvert and work with it, don’t fight it. It is part of your personality and doesn’t need to be fixed. Accept yourself and get creative in your learning techniques.

Article by Lingoo, the world’s biggest language exchange and homestay club. Lingoo gives language learners of all ages the power to decide how they would like to learn and practice a language and helps teachers and hosts to deliver authentic language learning experiences.

This is a sponsored post.

Motivation & Routine

Today I will give you a simple tip on how to combine motivation and routine to establish a daily practice of studies.

The idea that to achieve a goal one needs motivation has always been dominant. However, in recent years, a number of scientific studies have been changing this concept.

What is motivation?

Motivation is a process that can come from internal or external factors that make us act. The factors that most influence motivation are:

  • Desire: how much do you want something?
  • Need: how much do you need something?
  • Reward/Punishment: what will be the reward in case of a positive behavior and what will be the punishment if you don’t act?

Motivation in language learning

 

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The best articles on March about languages

Let’s start reading two motivational articles from the Eurolinguiste blog.

When you hate to study: how to recover from a burnout in language learning – Eurolinguiste

In this article, Shannon Kennedy gives great and simple tips on how to recover and get back to the studies, even when you don’t feel like.

How to overcome a plateau in language learning – Eurolinguiste Continue reading

The Top Ten Posts of 2016

What did people read here in 2016? Check it here!

10. Review of Pimsleur German – I, II & III

I was very excited to do this review, Pimsleur is a very interesting course, people love it or hate it, no middle term here.

9. Why learning a foreign language can change your life

This is a guest post from Lucia Leite, about the most interesting aspects of learning a language.

8. Duolingo Review

An old review about the most famous language app!

Continue reading

The best articles on November and December about laguages

After a long time without publishing a post, here is one with the best articles on November and December about languages!

November

 

Having Language Difficulties? It’s Time to Believe in Yourself – TheLinguist

What is the real difficulty people have with language learning? Learning a language is not an easy task, but it is far from impossible, but most of us fail to learn one. Steve’s thesis is that the reason behind is motivation, or rather, the lack of motivation that comes from the belief that learning a language is something very difficult.

The Best Way to Learn Another Language? From Interesting Content – TheLinguist

I believe that it is easier to learn a language with a material that is adapted to our own needs and goals. Steve Kaufmann believes in that too and here he gives 10 reasons why we should learn a language from contents that are interesting for us.

How to expand your vocabulary – Lingholic

A simple post, with a few tips on how to learn vocabulary effectively.

Discovery: to learn a foreign language thanks to hypnosis or online courses – FranceTVInfo.fr

[Article in French] – An interesting news report with two journalists. One tries to learn Japanese with hypnosis, the other tries to learn Russian with an online app. See the result after 20 hours of “study”. Continue reading

The best articles on October 2016 about languages

Here are the most interesting articles about languages that I read this last month.

3Fluency vs. Mastery: Can you be fluent without being good? – ScottHYoung.com

I really liked this article, because it distinguishes between two concepts, that we, language learners, often consider identical. Through this differentiation, we can understand why some people sound fluent in a short time, despite their small knowledge of the language. Continue reading

Why learning a foreign language can change your life

English-speakers have the great luxury of knowing the most in-demand language in the world.  When Europeans are sitting down for business or for recreation, the common language spoken is often English.  The same is true in Africa and in Asia.  So, if you are a native speaker of a language that many people around the world wish to learn, you might ask yourself – why would I learn a different language?  There are dozens of reasons, but let’s focus on four of them.

Work and travel opportunities

pexels-photo-128299-large

Speaking another language opens doors to visit other countries and parts of the world that wouldn’t be open to Continue reading

10 tips on how not learn a language

Are you tired of learning a language? Tired of the same advice about language learning?

Don’t worry, I have the solution!

Hownot

  1. Study only grammar

Why waste your time talking, listening, reading the language when you can just study grammar? Study only grammar and you will, probably, have more knowledge of the language grammatical structures than any native speaker will! And, who doesn’t want to know more than a native? Continue reading

Confessions of a Polyglot: demotivation

I don’t know about the other polyglots, but I can’t keep myself motivated all the time while learning a language.

In June, I had a big problem to keep me motivated to study German. Like everyone else, when I start to learn a language I get very excited, I search for thousands of information about the language, materials and methods.

Learning a language is to know a new world. Despite the difficult task ahead of us, every little step is a big step forward. By learning a word, you have improved 100% in your language. Every word learned is a victory. The feeling of understanding for the first time a word in a sentence and after a sentence in context is indescribable. However, the better you get, the lower the returns.

Suddenly, to understand a phrase is normal, to read an article is no longer difficult. You are not fluent, but manages to get by in the language. The language is no longer a novelty for you. Your curiosity fades, you become fascinated with some other language, focused on some other task, goal or challenge of your life and gradually abandon the language. The result? Days, weeks or even months without studying the language.

pexels-photo-66143 rollercoaster

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